About the Building

Mazeh 9 is one of an identical pair of buildings located at Mazeh 9 and Mazeh 7, which used to be called the Twin House.

The Twin House was designed and built in a neoclassical style by the architect, Yosef Berlin, and the engineer, Richard Pasovsky, between 1922 and 1927. The house was originally designed for two brothers who were doctors and wanted to live in identical wings – resulting in the first twin building in the city.

Since then, the building has served as a residence, offices of the Engineers and Architects Association and an architecture academy.

The Twin House was restored in June 1999 by Amnon Bar Or Architects and the wings on Mazeh 7 and Mazeh 9 were in effect separated. Mazeh 7 was converted into the Chelouche Gallery for Contemporary Art and Mazeh 9 became the Young Adults Center of the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality.

Mazeh Street

Mazeh is an acronym in Hebrew for Mizra Aharon HaCohen – who in 1924 was the chief rabbi of Moscow. He was also an author, political activist and a founder of the Hovevei Zion movement. The street is lined with many historic buildings from the early days of Tel Aviv in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Some were designed in an eclectic style and others in the Bauhaus style. Many of the buildings have been restored recently, including the Twin House. Furthermore, Mazeh Street, together with Rothschild Boulevard and sections of other streets in the area, has become a tourist attraction for architecture buffs.

In the 1920’s, the following expression/curse was popular with the locals:

“You should enter via Balfour and leave via Mazeh”

Hadassah Hospital used to be located between Balfour Street and Mazeh Street. The entrance and exit to the hospital were on Balfour Street, but patients who didn’t recover ‘left’ via Mazeh Street.

A Bit About the Architect

Mazeh is an acronym in Hebrew for Mizra Aharon HaCohen – who in 1924 was the chief rabbi of Moscow. He was also an author, political activist and a founder of the Hovevei Zion movement. The street is lined with many historic buildings from the early days of Tel Aviv in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Some were designed in an eclectic style and others in the Bauhaus style. Many of the buildings have been restored recently, including the Twin House. Furthermore, Mazeh Street, together with Rothschild Boulevard and sections of other streets in the area, has become a tourist attraction for architecture buffs.

In the 1920’s, the following expression/curse was popular with the locals:

“You should enter via Balfour and leave via Mazeh”

Hadassah Hospital used to be located between Balfour Street and Mazeh Street. The entrance and exit to the hospital were on Balfour Street, but patients who didn’t recover ‘left’ via Mazeh Street.

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